Impact of Coronavirus on eCommerce: Consumers Settle Into Quarantine (Update 4)

To provide understanding during this uncertain time, we are closely monitoring the impact of coronavirus on online consumer behaviors. Find all the latest insights on our Covid-19 eCommerce Impact data hub.

As more and more cities and regions across the world adopt lockdown and shelter-in-place measures, digital consumer patterns are once again shifting to reflect new needs and ways to adjust to an altered reality.

We’ve been analyzing billions of user sessions every day to bring you week-by-week updates on global browsing behaviors across industries. We have broadened our approach to include more than 4.8 billion sessions and 23 billion page views over the last 12 weeks of 2020, from January 6th 2020 to March 23rd 2020. To understand how the fast-evolving situation has impacted global eCommerce, we’ve compared recent weeks to the period immediately preceding the global reporting of the outbreak (or, the first 6 weeks of the year which we call the reference period).

In last week’s update, we referenced American psychologist’s Abraham Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, illustrated as a pyramid, with the lower tiers covering the most basic of needs, including food, safety, social needs etc. What we observed this week is that, after focusing their efforts on securing the most basic of needs such as groceries, health products and financing, consumers have been shifting their online activity to focus on items and services that will help get them through an extended period of isolation.

Coronavirus impact on eCommerce traffic

impact of coronavirus on ecommerce transactions

Online Grocery Stores Struggling To Keep Up With Demand

Traffic to online grocery stores shot up +84% in the last week, contributing to an overall +161% increase in visits since  February16. The number of transactions, however, was down -15% last week, in stark difference to the 32% increase recorded the week before. We have observed that in many countries, as consumers increasingly turn to online supermarkets to keep their pantries stocked, delivery slots are running low and some products are unavailable, resulting in a higher number of abandoned carts. At the extreme, in the UK, supermarket chain Iceland has restricted online shopping to “over state pension age, self-isolating and other vulnerable people.”

Retail healthcare clocked in a steady number of visits in the last week but significantly fewer transactions (down -35%), suggesting consumers may have already stocked up on essential medical supplies, vitamins, etc. to last them for the weeks to come.

As some grocery and retail healthcare players experience supply chain issues, it is worth noting that transactions on cosmetics websites were up last week by +33% from zero the previous week. Many beauty players have indeed decided to refocus their offering, with much success, on necessities such as soap and hand cleaning products.

 

Consumers Get Equipped To Stay Indoors

With a huge part of the workforce now officially in WFH mode, and a great number of children switching to e-learning, many consumers spent some time this week upgrading their hardware. Tech retail sites recorded a +20% increase in traffic in the last week — higher than the total jump in visits since February16 (+15%). The sector also recorded a higher number of purchases than any other week we analyzed, with a +30% increase in transactions. As a comparison point, the week immediately preceding this one had shown no change in the number of transactions.

Visits to sites specializing in books and toys increased +25% in the same period — double the total increase since the start of the outbreak. As parents everywhere contemplated weeks of homeschooling and indoor play, the number of transactions followed suit, with a +140% increase in the last week only.

And despite a -2% dip in the number of visits, sports retailers saw a +30% increase in the number of transactions this past week, a significant increase compared to the changes recorded in previous weeks. As social distancing measures limit people’s ability to go to the gym or take part in group sports, consumers are making sure they have the right equipment to keep up with their fitness regime at home. This is true in particular in the US with more than 60M American members of a gym club now in need to work out from home!

 

coronavirus impact on ecommerce transactions

 

Traffic to Media and Streaming Sites Peaks

Visits to TV/streaming sites went up +34% in the last week — almost three times the increase recorded during the previous week, and +43% since the start of the outbreak. Transactions for the sector doubled week on week, with a +108% increase over the previous seven days.

Media sites continue to record a weekly traffic increase (+24% this week), steadily adding up to a +80% increase since the start of reporting.

Connectivity has taken on a whole new importance in people’s lives over the last few weeks and the telecom sector is continuing to see its traffic grow. The +7% increase in visits to telecom sites this last week is half the spike in traffic observed three weeks ago, implying many customers have now made sure they are properly connected to weather the next few weeks or months.

Tourism and Real Estate Continue to Suffer

Following three weeks of relative stability and a slight dip two weeks ago, the real estate sector recorded a huge dip in traffic this past week — -46% compared to -52% since the beginning of the outbreak.

The travel and hospitality sector continues to experience a slowdown in traffic, which was down – 44% last week. Transactions were also down -67%, contributing to a decrease of -81% since the start of the crisis. Luggage sites followed suit, with a -42% decrease in visits — the biggest drop since we started our analysis.

Meanwhile, visits to fashion and luxury sites were down approximately -15% this past week, and apparel sites in particular saw a -8% decrease in transactions.

 

For a free walkthrough of the latest data, sign up for our upcoming webinar on March 31st, 1pm. Our CMO Aimee Stone Munsell will be sharing fresh verticalized insights in an effort to help experience stakeholders make sense of the impact we are all experiencing. 

 

Leveraging Data Science to Understand User Behavior

This article was written by our partner Cognetik, as part of our series highlighting direct insights from our large ecosystem of partners.

Data Science is an umbrella term used for multiple industries, such as data analytics, big data, business intelligence, data mining, machine learning & AI, and predictive analytics, and is clearly on an upward trend. Specifically, the big data and business analytics market was valued at $168.8 billion in 2018 and is forecasted to grow up to $274.3 billion by 2022 at a CAGR of 13.2%, according to Market Reports World.

The surge in spending for data science solutions, talent within the industry, and successful implementations demonstrate that companies understand the tremendous impact data can have on business performance.

As business interactions around the world become increasingly digitized, massive amounts of data are created and can be evaluated through predictive analytics tools to help companies gain a better understanding of market dynamics and underlying trends. With this knowledge, companies can then uncover the needs and expectations of their customers, and ultimately improve the end-user experience.

Therefore, it is no surprise that predictive models rank as one of the top big data technology trends around the world. The value data science can provide for businesses today is unprecedented.

However, even though leveraging data is at the heart of many businesses today, data alone can not provide all of the answers organizations need. Companies require insights and actionable paths they can take to optimize and adjust their business for maximum results.

Impact of Data Science & Global Utilization

The rise of data science has helped analysts and digital teams at large become real-life wizards who gather data at an unparalleled pace, validate its accuracy, assess its meaning, generate insights, formulate actionable plans, and deliver incredible results. Companies all over the world have realized that this isn’t necessarily magic, but rather a transformation and process they need to adopt in order to stay competitive and maintain relevance in the digital age.

Data Science has provided solutions for many industries that have been struggling for a long time. For example, in retail, companies have completely revamped the way they interact with their customers by focusing on creating easier paths for purchasing and tailoring the experience to the needs of specific audiences. In the healthcare industry, data science has drastically reduced the time needed to develop new drugs and has streamlined the ability for patients to get professional help in remote areas.

Cities have also been forever changed by data science, with thousands of sensors embedded throughout our neighborhoods to optimize traffic, reduce crime rates, and improve the overall quality of life.

The Connection Between Data Science & User Behavior

A business may experience thousands of digital interactions with a single user across display, search, social, and on the site or app. These interactions take place on multiple devices, such as mobile, desktop, tablet, or wearable devices.

Initially, analyzing immense data volumes associated with each individual user to make relevant connections was no easy task. However, with the rise of AI and machine learning algorithms, analyzing data points from multiple data sources to create a holistic view of users is now realistic and attainable.

User behavior, including actions, what they search for, and how they interact with digital properties as a whole, can now be collected and transformed into specific customer segments. These insights ultimately lead to personalized user journeys to gain a comprehensive understanding of user behavior, develop targeted advertising, and improve digital experiences.

For retailers today, recommendation engines are among the most used tools because they can give businesses an in-depth look into the interests and goals of their customers and help predict trends. The recommendation engines are complex machine learning components and deep learning algorithms designed to keep a track record of customer segments, analyze behavioral patterns based on this data, and improve the digital experience for customers.

Why You Need to Understand User Behavior

Banks and retailers were among the first industries that realized understanding behavioral patterns of their clients can lead to incredible breakthroughs.

For example, with data science, banks can manage their resources efficiently and make smart decisions through customer segmentation, fraud detection, customer data, and risk modeling via real-time predictive analytics.

By leveraging data science, banks can also have a holistic view of their customer lifetime value as well as part of specific profiling patterns. This, alongside behavioral pattern analysis, allows banks to make accurate predictions about their clients.

In time, customer profiling became one of the top data science applications in finance. By leveraging data they collect from all sources linked to their customers, financial institutions have managed to assess risk and liabilities associated with specific clients before even working with them.

Cognetik: Taking Behavior to the Next Level with Data Science

Our valued partnership with Contentsquare helps numerous industries capture intricate behavior patterns of consumers, provide sophisticated segmentation, and improve digital properties through the power of data.

Data science takes data analysis to the next level, allowing businesses to predict what users might do, augment the user journey, and provide incredible insights that are unmatched.

As an analytics and data science company, Cognetik helps the Fortune 1000 go above and beyond the standard recipe for making data science a reality. Our team of experts can guide you through the process, analyze what would work best for your business, and help you implement it in order to gain a holistic view of your users and improve your digital properties.

Adobe Stock, via titima157

What We Learned from 110 Million Visitor Sessions During Black Friday & Cyber Monday

We’re entering the most hectic time of the year again — and it’s not even (officially) the holiday season. That’s because the holiday season doesn’t formally start until the holy grail of retail events. We’re of course alluding to Black Friday, the crème de la crème for boosting revenue.

Our globally-extracted data attests to the weight this pre-holiday season event holds. (Have you seen the stampedes and clashes over commonplace items on this day?) With strong expectations of drawing in higher volumes of customers who purchase, now is the time to make sure your digital CX is spot on. 

We analyzed 110 million visitor sessions and inspected the performance of 600 million pages during the 2018 Black Friday season, stretching from November 11th to November 27th. 

Our data validates the expectations of higher sales and shopping carts surrounding these retail affairs (in most cases). There was also less site abandonment — in some countries. Let’s look at some of the key insights we gleaned from those numbers.

Big Wins in the USA — Cyber Monday Rules

Black Friday — historically a brick-and-mortar affair — is today a major digital sales event. In 2018, Black Friday digital sales reached record highs, generating $6.22 billion in revenue. Cyber Monday, as its name suggests, has always been about promotions in the digital space, i.e, eCommerce.

The United States followed this rationale, as its largest sales were chalked up to Cyber Monday last year. Black Friday sales saw a 17% hike in conversions, but Cyber Monday sales trounced these, with conversion increases of 60%.

And conversions weren’t the only thing on the rise — in the US, average carts increased during Black Friday by 12%

These heightened conversions were made possible owing to the checkout in particular. This was the case for not solely the US, but also in the UK. Let’s look at the stats we crunched on the checkout portion of the customer journey.

Adobe Stock, via Ivan

 

The Checkout: Higher Conversions, Lower Bounce Rates & Less Logins 

The conversion rate among visitors who reached the checkout funnel was 25% higher during both Black Friday and Cyber Monday. Pre-holiday shoppers who reached the checkout appeared to be more inclined to go through all the steps necessary to complete their purchase, from selecting a product to entering their shipping address. 

The checkout page spurred lower bounce rates in both the US and UK. In the US, the checkout bounce rate went down by 28.3%, and in the UK, it decreased by 32%. 

In the US, the checkout bounce rate went slightly up again on Cyber Monday, but was still lower than the bounce rate in the lead-up to the holiday shopping weekend.

Despite the good performance of the checkout page, it also incurred some engagement issues. Retailers in the UK saw half the checkout logins during Black Friday, and in the US, the logging in rate was 61% lower.

It could be that Black Friday and Cyber Monday shoppers are in a rush to complete their purchase, or that they are already logged into their account. 

In any case, optimizing the checkout step with a quick and easy login process (think one-click, social login, etc) will only encourage more sign-ins. Encouraging guest users to create an account after they convert is another long term marketing opportunity.

Adobe Stock, Via AlexanderNovikov

 

The Search Bar & Category Pages: Higher Global Usage, Yet Higher Frustration 

In all the countries we analyzed, search bar usage saw a stark increase on both Black Friday and Cyber Monday. US shoppers browsing retail tech sites drove a 31% increase to the click rate on the search bar. 

In the UK, specifically in the retail apparel sector, the search bar garnered a 3.16% click rate increase on Black Friday alone. The click rate rose to 10.01% on Cyber Monday. 

Visitors also browsed fewer category pages in general — 5% fewer in the US and 27% fewer in the UK — confirming the theory that, by the time Black Friday rolls around, shoppers have a good idea of what they’re looking for. 

The kickoff to holiday shopping season isn’t a time for idle window shopping, so brands should put their best offers on display well in advance of the big day.

Despite the seemingly good engagement coming from the click rate of the search bar, it can also be a source of frustration, as it drew in higher click recurrences across the board.

With an average of 2 clicks on the homepage search bar during Black Friday, the US felt the most acute wrath in high click recurrence. The UK followed suit, particularly in the fashion sector, where the search bar sustained a monumental 2,000% rise in click recurrence, from 0.08 to 1.78 clicks.

So while the search bar is a necessary element for possible conversions, it may not be very intuitive. It could be drawing up the wrong results or not pulling in products close to what users are typing in automatically.

Bad UX on the Add to Cart Button Globally

The search bar wasn’t the only element to incur a high click recurrence, as the add to cart button was racked by a similar fate. 

In France, particularly in the apparel sector, the add to cart button suffered a click recurrence increase of 5.85%.

It was slightly bigger in the UK apparel sector, having risen by 8%. Most notably, in the UK tech sector, it shot up by 62%.

The US was dealt the biggest blow on add to cart buttons, as they racked up a heaping 50% in click recurrence increases.

The root of this international UX trouble-maker could be error messages springing up when users clicked on the button, either due to a technical error or issues with inventory. 

The lessons to glean from this is to optimize the add to cart button and make sure you don’t run out of products. Pay special attention to best sellers and other popular items.

An Eclectic Set of Acquisition Sources

Traffic from emails was higher by a hulking 79% during Black Friday and Cyber Monday, compared with the prior period. 

Contrary to the US, UK brands received a higher-than-average visitor flow during this season. On Black Friday, organic traffic, or traffic from SEO, was 33% higher, and direct traffic also increased by 24%.

Cyber Monday did not follow suit in the UK. Instead, brands piqued the interest of incoming visitors through paid sources and CRM. Email-based traffic was 160% higher, while social media garnered a king-size 310% increase in traffic.

Whether your brand uses paid sources or goes the organic route, make sure your copy is compelling. Add your best deals to captivate more interest. 

And when creating SEA or paid social ads, make sure your landing pages are consistent with the messaging and offers mentioned in your ads. 

Capitalizing on Black Friday & Cyber Monday in 2019 & Beyond

As the drivers of major retail events, it is incumbent upon brands to create good experiences — digital and otherwise — to attract customers’ attention and most importantly, retain them. As our data shows, Black Friday and Cyber Monday are key forces for higher revenue streams and fewer bounces. However, there is plenty brands can do to improve the UX, reduce frustration, and engage higher add to carts.

For example, product and CTA findability carries a great deal of weight in user experience. As do elements that appear to be clickable, but turn out not to be. 

Read more about how The North Face leveraged granular customer data to optimize their gift guide

Luckily, you can refer to a slew of hard data, including industry benchmarks and see how to improve your digital experience for this year’s Black Friday and Cyber Monday. But it doesn’t end here. 

You’ll need a continuous stream of data to refer to — and we’re not only referencing industry criteria. You’ll need to have a sturdy set of data on your customers’ behavior. That way, you can determine where customers are struggling and where they’re having a good UX. Once you’re equipped with this data, you can proactively make optimizations so that for your customers, Black Friday and the holiday season will truly be times of giving, i.e., buying.

3 Travel UX Must-Dos for Your Travel Booking Website

Travel UI design can be a hard nut to crack, especially when it comes to conversions. Our recent analysis of 2,100 Million visitor sessions across several verticals found that travel and tourism has one of the lowest mobile conversion rates of all sectors (0.90% average).

Desktop reigns over mobile within this sector on every performance metric, touting higher conversion rates: 2.90% vs 0.90% on mobile, and average cart values $1,860 vs. $1,790 on mobile.

Visitors spend almost double the amount of time on desktop as they do on mobile sites — 6 minutes 4 seconds on average, suggesting a less than optimized experience. The bounce rate appears to confirm this story, with a considerably higher rate of bounces on mobile than on desktop visitors bounce less, bearing a bounce rate of 39.80% (45.70% versus 39.80%). 

It is clear that even in this mobile-first age, booking an international flight or a train ticket on your smartphone phone may still be far from being user-friendly, let alone instinctive. Since travelers are largely defined by their mobility, developing headache-free solutions is paramount. Take advantage of the following tips to optimize your site for mobile users.

Make it Easy to Navigate Your Site

Whether you provide a multitude of transportation options or accommodation around the world, it’s imperative to optimize your website or app for booking on-the-go.

The best way to achieve this end is by ensuring your users can easily find what they are looking for on your site or app. 

That’s where the navigation menu comes in handy. By providing a clear navigation menu, visitors can quickly navigate the myriad of information and deals you have on offer. The more frustrated visitors become trying to navigate your site, the more likely they will bounce or exit without having converted.

Make sure that the most important parent categories are visible upon reaching the site. Avoid using ambiguous wording for navigation links so that hesitation times remain low, especially for featured content, offers, or features. Don’t leave users guessing what kind of content they’ll be directed to before clicking on something.

In addition to a clean navigation, use category or product pushes throughout the site in relevant areas so users don’t always have to rely on the global navigation (especially if it isn’t sticky to the page.) This can help keep your users engaged even after they’ve found what they’ve been looking for.                                          

An example of good travel UI design: On JetBlue’s homepage, the focus is solely on searching for flights, vacations, hotels, or cars. However, upon opening the menu, users are presented with key categories and CTAs dedicated to booking, managing, or exploring travel options. Categories and subcategories are written in large text and use helpful icons. The contrast in the background of the sub-categories makes it easier to read.

Create Seamless Experiences between Mobile, Web and Mobile Apps.

Many travel apps, especially those for booking transportation and accommodation, require specific functions and features that use the native capabilities of mobile phones.

For example, users are able to add their boarding passes, pull up their tickets or even track their baggage through mobile apps. Are travel brands replicating these essential features for their mobile websites? If not, they’re missing out on key mobile UX improvements. That’s because equipping users with access to the same types of features across platforms is key to providing a seamless travel UX. 

Surface Upsells and Cross-Sells When it’s Relevant

Users are easily overwhelmed when presented with too many options to choose from or multiple tasks to complete. Focusing the user on the most important task, such as booking a flight, is much harder when users are bombarded with a variety of extras or promotions they are encouraged to take advantage of. 

You wouldn’t put every checkout step on one page; the booking process should take a similar approach. It should be spread out across several steps to make it more easily digestible. 

The same goes for any upsells or cross-sells. Options should be progressively surfaced during different stages of the journey and in places where they are most relevant. 

When a flight is selected, the users are immediately provided an option to upgrade their seat. It clearly lists the benefits and price to upgrade. Bold colors that pop from the screen are used to indicate these special options.

That Does it for Travel UX 

Overall, your travel website should make any booking or research process as easy as possible. With mobile users increasingly on the move, any process should be made simple and easy to understand. That includes reimagining and optimizing crucial features so they take into account the context and goals of distinct audience segments. Learn what works best by studying your users’ behaviors and putting customer intelligence at the heart of your experience decisions. 

How We’re Empowering Brands to Improve Lives Through Digital Experiences

By Lucie Buisson, VP of Product, Contentsquare

At Contentsquare, we envision a world where every digital interaction improves lives. As we spend more and more time online these days, it’s important to us that the experience is meaningful.
But today, the digital world is plagued by poor experiences. Brands have traditionally been unable to deliver the experiences customers want online because they haven’t been able to easily understand what their customers really want. It’s not just about making sure your customers can find the right product pages or the contact us page — it’s much more nuanced than that. Your customer’s changeable mindset and intent can completely change their behavior online, and most brands can’t tailor the experience needed on demand.

But we do believe that brands have the ability to improve people’s lives. Making the time you spend online more meaningful doesn’t have to be impossible — and so our strategy for achieving our vision has always been to empower brands with unique behavioral insights to create better experiences.
To that end, we took the strategic decision to acquire experience analytics company Clicktale in July 2019. While both Contentsquare and Clicktale are rooted in customer behavioral data and insights, Clicktale’s session replay and heatmaps complement Contentsquare’s page zoning and customer journeys capabilities. Today, just 90 days after that acquisition, we are releasing major new capabilities of the Contentsquare platform, which includes innovation driven by the combined R&D and product team of more than 170 innovators strong.

9 trillion reasons to use Contentsquare

Now, we can confidently offer the most complete experience analytics platform on the market. None of our competitors can give you the level of insight into your customer behavior we can thanks in part to the fact that our solution analyses 9 trillion digital interactions every day for each of our customers.
Now, the combined product is the only complete system of insight that offers brands the ability to do all of the following:

No other solution can give you a better level of insight to help you understand and create insight-driven innovation.

Into the future — where our product will sit within the customer touchpoints ecosystem

Improving any kind of digital experience, whether it’s on desktop, mobile or any other channel, starts with collecting the right kind of behavioral data. Customers behave differently depending on the touchpoint you interact with them on, and so it’s important to measure precisely how those customers are using your channels so you can tailor the experience accordingly.

And behaviors won’t necessarily stay the same over time, either, so simply analyzing behavior just once won’t be enough. You need to continuously measure behavior over time so you can tailor your experience to whatever nuanced behavioral changes your customers portray.

But the touchpoints themselves are starting to evolve. In the next three years or so, we’re going to see a shift in the types of interactions between brands and customers. By 2021, experiences will be more conversational, mobile, personalized, social and immersive. All these trends are going to transform the customer touchpoints ecosystem, whether it’s the brand’s own digital channels, physical channels, third-party channels or marketplaces.

If you want to create a great overall experience for your customers, you can’t solely focus on your own digital channels like your desktop and mobile sites. You have to provide a consistent experience across all touchpoints, and do the marketing basics (like providing the right product at the right price) well. That’s why our vision for our product is to help you with a significant proportion of those touchpoints — beyond just digital.

Once you’re measuring all your channels though, the key, of course, is to unify all that data and product intuitive visualizations so even the non-digital business units in your organization can understand it and draw insights from it. Only then can we start to realize a vision where digital interactions improve lives — when the whole organization is on board.

Those organizations that lead on digital experience tend to see benefits of 3–5x on measures such as lead generation, conversion, price premiums and loyalty as a result of offering a great experience across the board. And customers are more likely to pay a premium price when they have a great experience versus a poor one.

At Contentsquare, we can help you to compete with the digital leaders, and help you gain an insight into your customers like never before. Request a demo to find out how.

How to Enhance User Flow with UX Analysis

UX analysis is methodically different from brand to brand, as each has its own set of KPIs and priorities.

User flow comes into play where UX analysis is concerned, as it is a fundamental part of UX, fulfilling a pivotal role in maintaining the sales funnel and, for this reason, conversions.

Also known as visitor flow or customer journey, the user flow denotes the path that a typical user on a website takes to complete a task, including all the steps along the way.

Mapping out visitor journeys and examining all the finer points of the user flow, such as what your visitors are doing on each page they visit, will inform you on how to improve your UX. To do so, you’ll need to begin with enhancing your user flow.

UX Analysis for Improving User Flow

Here are the steps you’ll need to take to tweak user flow with a UX analysis.

1. A Visual, High-Level View of User Flow

The first step in examining user flow is to access a high-level visualization of it. Much like a birds’ eye view, such a perspective displays all the steps of the user flow in one clear illustration of the pages viewed within the customer journey.

Where visitors land, which task(s) they complete and at what stage they do it unveils what they have been attempting or seeking from your website. Alternatively, the regions in a website in which users couldn’t complete an action reveal their struggles.

Visualizing where visitors enter your site, where they head to next and ultimately how they exit helps add a layer of behavioral understanding to customer segments.

Clarity and accessibility are key in this step, so make sure you use an analytics tool that can clearly lay out an analysis of your visitors’ journeys.

2. Observe & Simplify the Number of Steps

Secondly, you’ll need to scope out the number of steps in the user flows. This is important, as it shows the complexity your visitors undergo to complete each action. It allows you to surmise if you should increase or lessen the number of steps in these users’ journeys.

Identify friction points in the customer decision journey, including looping behavior and premature exits. Contemplate whether your visitors’ need to fill out a certain form field or enter a particular landing page to lead them to conversions or other actions. If not, cut these steps out! Less is more often times.

3. A Deeper, Page-by-Page Read in Your UX Analysis

Next, you’ll have to heed the happenings, aka individual visitor behaviors on each page of their user flows. This will help paint a clear picture of how your users’ traverse your site.

Analyzing visitor paths through your site can immediately flag pages with issues — be that an error message or a UX obstacle. For example, what is causing visitors to exit after adding to cart?  

Once you’ve found these problems or points of friction, you can begin to conceive some optimization endeavors.

Besides conversions, you should decide on the metric(s) you seek to make the most strides on in your user flows. Perhaps you want to see a larger click recurrence or a smaller hesitation time. When you zero in a few KPIs or metrics, you’ll be able to tackle user flow optimization in a more precise and conscientious way. This will allow your team to implement a more granular approach to improving each step in the digital visitor journey.

4. Implement A/B Tests

Then, consider how you can improve the user flow by implementing A/B tests. A/B testing is a strategy in which two versions of a website or app are tested against each other on their performance. This will help answer questions about why the setup or features in one page are more effective than another, allowing you to make informed optimization decisions

Finally, after you’ve delved into your UX analysis, you can make changes to your UX accordingly, which will directly influence user flows. Perhaps they’ll improve user flows, making them easier for users to achieve their tasks without issues. There is also the possibility that these changes will have little effect on these flows.

What’s certain is that a granular, behavioral analysis provides a much more lucid picture of how your visitors interact with your content. Although traditional analytics are certainly part of the makeup of this picture, they do not present a comprehensive user flow.

Accessing the user flow requires sifting from an overview to granular data, from viewing journeys to in-page steps, and zooming in on the obstacles.

Culling this data will allow you to make fact-based decisions, instead of those based on intuition.

More Tips on User Flow & UX Analysis

The number of steps a user must take to complete a task often corresponds with their satisfaction over the quality of the digital experience. A good experience is unlikely to have points of friction in which visitors find themselves burdened in the steps towards completing an action.

However, there are instances in which shorter journeys are not the UX target; there will be instances where you want to drive longer sessions and deeper engagement.

An in-depth level of data can help you answer whether a short site duration is telling of a good or bad UX. You have to inquire if a short site navigation is due to visitors having completed their goals or if they struggle with the experience.

An exhaustive UX analysis will shine light on these questions. And since seamlessness is a cornerstone of a good UX, an exhaustive analysis of customer journeys goes hand in hand with digital customer satisfaction.